Roast Chicken Dinner — Gravy, Mashed Potatoes, Peas


Roast chicken with mashed potatoes, peas and
gravy. It’s one of the great meals of all time, and I think I’ve got it down to a
science. I roast my chicken in a slightly unconventional
way that, among other benefits, results in especially good gravy. I want to thank Skillshare for sponsoring
today’s video! Skillshare is an amazing website where you can find online courses
and learn from experts. Real experts, not just guys in their kitchen with a camera.
25,000 classes to choose from for less than $10 a month. The first 500 of you who sign
up using my referral link in the description will get a 2-month trial of Skillshare for
free. In a 10-inch skillet, I put a little olive
oil, and then an approximately four-pound chicken. You don’t have to do this, but
I like scoring the legs. Three cuts straight down to the bone. This makes for really thoroughly
cooked, fall-apart, crispy drumsticks. Then I grind on a ton of pepper — enough
for both the top and the bottom of the chicken. Same with the salt. Enough for the whole chicken.
Then I smoosh all the oil and the seasoning around the entire chicken, right there inside
the pan. If I’ve got it around, I’ll stick a piece of lemon, a shallot and maybe some
herbs inside. And look, because I did all that right inside
the pan, I only have to wash my hands once in the entire prep of this chicken. Now here’s my big trick. Turn the heat on
medium under that skillet. While the oven preheats to 400 F, I just cook the bottom
of the chicken on the stovetop for like a good 15 minutes. I honestly don’t know why
everyone doesn’t do this. This solves the problem of the white meat always being done
before the dark meat is. The dark meat, the thighs — those are on the bottom, getting
blasted with heat right now. Also near the bottom is the super-thick part of the breast
that’s always lagging behind the rest of the white meat when you roast normally. Basically I leave it on here until it smells
like the bottom is about to start burning, then I just throw it in the oven. The convection
setting is great for roasting chicken, if you have it. Once that’s in, I can work on the potatoes.
I start with about a pound of red potatoes. The skins taste good and look pretty, no there’s
reason to take them off. I just cut them into some smaller pieces that’ll boil quicker. Then I do one big Russet potato. I like the
texture and flavor combination of the two kinds of potatoes together. But Russet skins
are gross in mashed potatoes. Baked or roasted they’re great, but boiled they have the
texture of wet construction paper, so that’s why I peel this one. And then I cut it into a little bigger pieces
than the red potatoes, because the Russet cooks quicker and I want them to be done at
the same time. Fill up the pot with water, and while it comes
to a boil, I peel and chop a ton of garlic. I’ve tried all kinds of flavorings inside
mashed potatoes; I’ve found nothing that beats garlic. Chicken’s been in for about a half hour
at this point, so I’m gonna check it. White meat is at 120 F. 40 degrees left to go. At
this point, I put some garlic powder on the breast. That tends to burn a bit if I put
it on right at the beginning. I also usually up the temperature a bit for this last stretch,
just to brown the skin. The potatoes are done when you can really
easily push a fork through them. I’ll go dump those in a colander in the sink. And
then in the same pot, I’ll melt some butter and then fry the garlic until it just starts
to go golden. Then I’ll put in maybe half a cup of milk and let that heat up. Potatoes
go back in, and I’ll just cover this up and pull it off the heat for now. After about 45 minutes in the oven, this chicken
is done. I like to pull it when the white meat is 160 F. The internal temp will probably
rise to 165 as it rests. 165 is what you’re supposed to hit for safety reasons. If you
need to be extra cautious, maybe cook it a few degrees more than I did here. Look at
that even color you get with convection heat. Alright, to make gravy, we gotta get the chicken
out of there. I rest it on a plate rather than a cutting board, you’ll see why in
a sec. Now check this out. Pre-cooking the bottom
of the chicken on the stovetop also gives you this incredible layer of fond with which
to make gravy. Also, roasting at such a high temperature means that most of the juice that
came out will have evaporated, so there’s no need run this through a gravy separator.
That is basically straight fat with which we can make roux to make our gravy. You could
use it all, but that would make way more gravy than I usually need for this meal. So I pour
like half of it off, and yes, I’m gonna pour straight into my potatoes. It’ll taste
amazing in there. I’m basically using it in place of some of the butter you’d normally
put in, thought that’s not gonna stop me from also putting in a bunch of butter too.
I’ll just cover that up and let the butter melt. Now I’m gonna turn the heat on medium under
this pan, and when it’s sizzling, I’ll whisk in just enough flour to make a thick
paste, and just cook that for a minute until I smell the flour going nutty. Then, you could just put in water or cartooned
stock, but yeah, I do like to start with a little white wine for sweetness. Whisk that
in, and then whisk in some water, too. And the color at first will not be appetizing.
Just give it some time. As you simmer this for 5 or 10 minutes, the little brown bits
floating around in there will dissolve and impart their color to the rest of the gravy.
Here’s the shallot from inside the chicken. You could throw it in to flavor the gravy
a little bit, or you could cut it up into little bits and throw those in. Here’s the lemon from inside the chicken.
If you don’t like lemony gravy, don’t squeeze this in, but sometimes I like it. Here’s why I rest the chicken on a plate.
A plate is really good at collecting all the juices that’ll come out of the bird as it
rests, and it makes it really easy to pour those back into the gravy where they belong. Alright, potatoes. I’ll grind in a ton of
pepper, and some in the gravy while I’m at it. And then start with one big pinch of
salt in the potatoes, then mash. I’m conservative with the milk up front, so that if the texture
is too stiff, I can just add a little more milk at this stage. You can’t take it away. Mashers are not good a mixing, so when it’s
all mashed up, I’ll switch to a rubber spatula to get everything evenly integrated and then
I can test for seasoning. Now I’ll just cover it and leave on the warm setting. Gravy is looking perfect at this stage, which
means it’s actually too thick, because it’ll thicken up a lot as it cools. So I’ll put
in a little more water, and hey, more juice has come out of the chicken. Test for seasoning.
That is done, unless you want to strain it to get the chunks out. I like the chunks. Peas. I do four cups of frozen peas in a microwave-safe
jug. If you can get high-quality fresh peas, great, but I usually can’t. I just cover
those in water and toss them in the microwave for a few minutes. That’s just enough time to carve the chicken.
First thing I do is tear the leg quarters off with my hands. They are so well-cooked
with this method that they just pull right off, like those grocery-store rotisserie chickens.
Then I cut the legs off the thighs. Rather than slicing the white meat off the
bird, I like to cut each breast off whole. This is easier and you get a cleaner cut if
you remove the wishbone before roasting, but honestly that’s kinda tricky and these days
I don’t think it’s worth it. Then I just tear off whatever bits are still
clinging to the carcass with my hands. That’ll be perfect for chicken pot pie later. Ooo,
there’s the oyster. Mine. Take a breast, cut off the wing (also mine). Then with the
breast off, it’s really easy to slice it up however you want it. It also makes it possible
to slice against the grain like this, though that doesn’t really matter with chicken
like it does with steak. When the water in the peas is boiling, you’re
good to strain them, then I put in a little butter and some salt and stir it around to
let the butter melt. Now, real quick, I’m just gonna warm my plates in the residual
heat of the oven. Just takes a minute. Those plates will actually reheat this chicken if
it’s gone cold while we rested and carved it. Plus these sides, that’s easily enough chicken
for four adults. I think the gravy is mostly for the potatoes,
though I do like a little bit on the white meat, too. Not that it needs it. Pre-cooking
the dark meat lets you cook that breast until it is just done, so it is really juicy. And check out this thigh. It pulls apart like
barbeque. This right here is why I think peas are the
best vegetable for this — they hitchhike on a forkful of mashed potatoes. Oh, remember
those scored legs? Look at all that extra surface area. It’s so well-browned, and
it’s so well-seasoned. It also pulls apart like barbeque because the scoring allowed
it to cook faster. I love those. Let’s see if I can get one fork with all
four elements on it at once. Yasssss. That sticky mash literally brings the whole dish
together. Look how glossy that gravy is. That’s from the chicken fat in the roux. It’s a
bit of work, but that is just a totally killer Sunday supper. Now, you may be thinking, what about that
technique where you roast the chicken breast-side down for the first half? Won’t that achieve
the same goal of giving the dark meat the head start that it needs? Well, I finally
tried that the other day. I’ll show you what happened in a minute. Thanks again to Skillshare for sponsoring
this video. If you’re like me, you like to learn by doing — you just wanna watch
a video of an expert doing it to get you started. Skillshare is perfect for people like us.
Perfectly organized, concise courses for every skill imaginable. Skills that can help you
advance your career, your creativity, your passions. Tons of cooking class on there,
from basic knife skills on up. I’ve been watching this amazing Indian cooking course
by Shefaly Ravula. Of all the world’s major cuisine categories, Indian food is probably
my favorite. I have botched it every time that I’ve tried it, but she is giving me
the confidence to give it another go. Her whole course is packed into just 45 minutes.
It’s all killer, no filler. It’s what I know you demand. You can start learning a new skill with Skillshare
today. Only the first 500 of you who sign up using my referral link in the description
will get that free 2-month trial. If you don’t want to remember how to spell my last name,
I totally understand. The link is at the top of the description. Now, here’s what happened when I tried the
very popular roasting the chicken breast-side-down method, as documented on my Instagram stories.
Short version: It’s a pretty good method, but I think mine is way better. That looks real weird. Here comes the breast
side. OK, now I guess I try to brown the top. Still not great color. And it’s done. I
cook quite slowly and not like a fast, professional chef, who’s going bddddda. So I feel very
insecure about cooking on-camera right now without fast forward. It all tastes the same in the end. Yes it does. Alright. So, final verdict? I don’t know, we haven’t eaten it yet.
It was kinda harder to make than my method, and the color is definitely not as good. I’ll way that it was good. But your chicken
is really really good, and that one was just good. Awwww. Oh man.

100 comments on “Roast Chicken Dinner — Gravy, Mashed Potatoes, Peas”

  1. Adam Ragusea says:

    Q: Aren't red potatoes bad for mash? Don't they set up like library paste when they cool?
    A: Yes, if you only use red. But the mixture of the two types of starches you get by adding in a Russet (or any floury potato) fixes that problem. I like the red skins. Yukon potatoes are nice too, but where I live you can only buy those in giant bags.

    Q: What was the brown thing in the frozen peas?
    A: A little piece of stem. Not unusual. I took it out.

    Q: Why frozen peas?
    A: Good fresh peas are really hard to come by. They start losing their sweetness the second you pick them. I speak from experience; I used to grow them. The few times I've gotten fresh peas at the farmer's market, they've been starchy by the time I could eat them. Frozen peas are the greatest frozen vegetable. The farmers/processors are able to pick and freeze them at their peak of sweetness, and the flash freezing process they use really preserves the texture. The times in my life when I've had perfect fresh peas have been moments of divine inspiration, but they've also been few and far between.

    Q: Can you be more specific about why you didn't like the breast-side-down method?
    A: 1) It didn't cook the dark meat as much as I want, though it did a better job than standard roasting; 2) There wasn't nearly as much good fond, so the gravy was pale and bland; 3) The breast didn't have time to brown as much as I wanted; 4) It was kinda hard to know when to flip it, and the flip was kinda physically tricky. The breast stuck to the pan and the skin tore.

    Q: Why didn't you make Yorkshire pud?
    A: I'm willing to be proven wrong, mate, but I've eaten many yorkies in the U.K. and in my own kitchen, and I think they're overrated. I think the gravy is a higher use for that fat. But you do you!

    Q: Why did you let that lemon seed just drop into the gravy?
    A: Because I'm not fussy. Unless it's for a dessert or something, I never worry about catching the seeds. They haven't bothered me yet. But you do you.

    Q: I saw some pink flesh in your leg quarters. Are they undercooked?
    A: No, they're cooked to smithereens, which is how I like my dark meat. The flesh right around the hip joint will pretty much always be pink, even if you cook it to a really high temp, as I did. This is one of many reasons why color is an imperfect gauge of temperature in meat.

    Q: Why is your gravy pale?
    A: I wouldn't call it pale; I'd call it blonde, which is how I usually like poultry gravy. You could make yours more brown by cooking the roux for longer. Personally, I really dislike the flavor of brown roux. In the U.K., they're also fond of using additives to brown their gravy, such as a liquid caramel coloring they call "gravy browning." You could also use that, I guess!

    END NOTE: I really want to thank everyone for being so positive and supportive about my first sponsorship! Skillshare is a great company, they've been great to work with, and you'd be doing me and yourself a favor if you clicked on the link up top and got your two-month trial. I also want to thank my agent, Colin West, who is out there making a lot of things happen for me with his bad-ass Scottish accent. I put a lot of time and effort into these videos, and it's great to have my labors rewarded via good ol' fashioned commerce. As a long-time journalist, that's a very unusual experience for me!

  2. Moto Redux says:

    CLASSIC

  3. Sergio Santos says:

    I think he has gotten everything down to a science

  4. rpaulson597 says:

    I tried making this and it tore apart my family. 3/5 wouldn't make it again.

  5. Iñaki E says:

    The meal that cartoon families always be eating

  6. Preston Anderson says:

    I'm watching this for the second time, and it really is such a good recipe. Easy, Delicious, cheap, and healthy-ish. A killer weeknight combo.

  7. Tula says:

    is nobody questioning how Adam knows what wet construction paper tastes like?

  8. Keith Fletcher says:

    Why I season my egg, not my chicken

  9. Shivam mane says:

    you need to sharpen your knife

  10. Kian Davis says:

    How many likes equals how many white wine bottles he has

  11. bee kuczimacklemore says:

    why do you have an electric stove?

  12. Nathaniel Neal says:

    What is the “oyster”?

  13. Michael Scott says:

    Can you come to my house and cook 4 me u r really talented

  14. Rishabh Purohit says:

    He let the like seeds go into the gravy?

  15. overqualified toe sucker says:

    Why i season my oven not my pan

  16. Jose Almonte says:

    Its wierd seeing him without the 5 o clock shadow

  17. Gravitas Online says:

    Throw in a buttermilk biscuit and you're good to go.

  18. Jirat Kongsin says:

    Today i see chickens eating roasted chicken epic

  19. Timothy Koh says:

    all filler no killer looks at script

  20. BEAN BADDY says:

    how the fuck is this chicken "so well browned" when it looks yellow, and gloopy?

  21. Alex Worm says:

    Lmao you have a pic with Jay cutler, I had to go back to check if it was him lol

  22. Izel Sucks says:

    Idk why but every time he pours wine into the food I think about that vine where she’s like “two shots of vodka”

  23. m1thril- says:

    Why I cook my plate, NOT my meal.

  24. MrMarki134 says:

    I recommend using Pedro Ximenez or any other kind of sherry for the gravy! It's my father's recipe and I've always loved it!

  25. Ionikip says:

    Mmhh yes.

    Summon the gravy

  26. Krishnakumar P says:

    Hey Adam. When I put the chicken in the oven what setting should I use. I don't have convection. Should I put bottom element or top element or both

  27. XoyaXenia says:

    Adam the fucking boss

  28. Joe Mama says:

    me and my mom watched this video yesterday, we made the meal, and it was honestly the best meal I had ever made, dare i say this is what I want for thanksgiving

  29. Mathias Boye Rasmuseen says:

    You're the only one that can make us think that microwaving peas is a good thing to do

  30. Liquid Zulu says:

    You gotta try air fried chicken in panko breadcrumbs, works best for thighs imo. Healthy and fucking delicious

  31. kamiliachadli says:

    Peas are lowkey the best side

  32. Jack Cassidy McCarthy says:

    I Hate Chicken (Besides Chicken Wings) I Love Mash And Carrots (Because I'm Irish)

  33. Golden Duck says:

    Adam doesn't like to listen to anyone. He has "questioner" tendencies. That's why he changes the way things are typically done.

  34. Mintyy says:

    I wanted to drop kick u when i saw ur face

  35. Sergeant Rainstorm says:

    6:16
    Gordon Ramsay has unsubscribed

  36. Stoicanescu Edward says:

    That looks like the most wholesome meal ever

  37. paddydoodle xx9 says:

    We all know what's going to be added to the gravy

  38. big black guy says:

    Recipe was a flop, skin was tough as a boot, meat was incredibly underdone even after cooking it for longer. Had to pull the temp down to 350 and cook it for an hour to salvage it. Won't follow it again

  39. Zain Saeed says:

    S M O O S H

  40. Myles Christ says:

    Thank you Adam Ragusea

  41. Grim Reaper says:

    Hey kid want some WIGHT WINE!?!

  42. JIMARI says:

    i'm hungry

  43. Some Guy says:

    It's late, I'm tired, I'm hungry now, too. Thanks!

  44. Yusuf Mohammed says:

    Why I rest my plate, not my chicken

  45. Zemain says:

    That yas killed me

  46. VaporFN_Archie says:

    Am i the only one who’s watched this like 50 times?

  47. Nevermind says:

    6:08 if you look at the measuring thing there’s a bug they came out of the pea bag

  48. Tommy BRO says:

    How is it a good idea to use a microwave?

  49. Aionee says:

    8:04 When you hit your pinky with the corner of the table.

  50. Bryton Duropan says:

    Out of context this sounds like a serial killer's guide on how to cook a human.

  51. Sophia Chen says:

    8:04

  52. John Dowson says:

    white

  53. Suzie Saunders says:

    Made it! Best chicken. OF ALL TIME
    https://m.imgur.com/gallery/YrcETfY

  54. Ricky Mitchell says:

    Why I flavor (apply shower gel) my bathtub and not myself.

    Adam Ragusea -2019-

  55. ren egade says:

    Could you use a similar technique for turkey?

  56. Bronze.Actual says:

    This guy’s life is sponsored by skillshare

  57. Black Knightz says:

    "Enough for 4 adults"……………..or 2 if you're a hungry fat fuck like me~

  58. JETS Talk says:

    No one:

    This know-it-all: I'vE gOT it DowN t0 a sCieNcE

  59. Xavier Ward says:

    I watch these videos to get hungry before dinner

  60. Eldaneuron says:

    Here’s why I season my rest and not my plate to add white wine I’m the cherry pie guy

  61. Mikey Guest says:

    Come to the UK you can see a proper roast dinner

  62. Leonard Berger says:

    You should have washed your hands before the prep so that would make it two times unless you like being sick 🙂

  63. nyaki says:

    adam: you would typically use milk here but
    me: he’s going to say white wine isn’t he
    adam: i find the white wine adds more sweetness
    me: called it

  64. daneo says:

    ok Adam you have amazing commentary in your vids. love your style

  65. Stephen Rowan says:

    Is there any way this could work with a turkey?

  66. lonewolf 4090 says:

    This the meal the Griffin family had every night

  67. Alex K says:

    I cooked the chicken to 160F in the thickest part of the breast, but it came out pretty dry…

  68. The Creeper King says:

    “All killer no filler” sounds like an ad for a medicine brand

  69. The Poltical One says:

    Chicken looking pink…..

  70. Disco Queenie says:

    FOR 4 adults or one hungry ass teenager

  71. L O F L I G H T says:

    6:10 is that a worm wtf ?

  72. Kaitlin Luksa says:

    Thanks this is going to be my go-to way to roast chicken from now on! I love that it makes making gravy so much less of a hassle.

  73. Emperor_ Couchpotato says:

    Wait Adam how do you know what wet construction paper tastes like? 😐

  74. peppermint_oj says:

    Put some mint in with those peas 😉

  75. Tony Le says:

    This is pretty late but would you be able to apply this roasting method to a turkey?

  76. Joseph Lau says:

    You should take the chicken out when the breasts reach about 130f. The residual heat will cook it to 140’s, which is cooked perfectly through. 165f is way over cooked. The 165f recommendation is just a simplified guideline that ignores the nuances of how it actually works. Time under temperature matters. I can’t take any recipe seriously that considers 165f breasts anywhere near juicy. It tastes dry.

  77. Ferno says:

    If you guys want to have a juicy chicken you can add chiken broth or any type of delicious soup or something that you think will go good with the chiken then put it in a needle the inject it into the chicken you can do it before you roast or after your welcome no body likes dry chiken

  78. Tristan Andersen says:

    I wouldn’t call your chicken roasting method unconventional. It’s basically MPW’s method minus the part where you slather the bird in knorr stock pots.

  79. David Fitzpatrick says:

    YAAAAAAASSASS

  80. Dr. King Schultz says:

    chicken looks fucking raaaawwww

  81. 888chupacabra says:

    Making this right now. It's like Thanksgiving but with a chicken? And today is Halloween? And I'm ending sentences of a non-inquisitive nature with question marks? Strange stuff. Hope it comes out good!

  82. Ginger Lee Girl says:

    I love the way you think with the exception of the temp of your birds.

  83. Robin Dobros says:

    You need Nutmeg in your Mash Potatoes. Its the best

  84. Coffee Jaytee says:

    This is the only channel where I don't skip the "sponsored" section. I like the way you discuss.

  85. This lucio main gon frick dat ass says:

    YASSŚSSSŠ

  86. WizardOCE says:

    Why I rest my chicken on a plate, not a rack.

  87. Boanerges says:

    Can I marinate the chicken in white wine, Adam?

  88. Ktbone19 says:

    Adam, I recently tried this roast chicken recipe, and I was skeptical at first; I thought that the meat would be bland because there’s no brine. I’m happy to say I was wrong — it came out perfectly! Juicy, tender, and insanely flavorful and delicious. Thank you for this recipe — my family and I are certain to make it again!

  89. Ryan O'Donnell says:

    I did this recipe but I seasoned my pan instead of my chicken.

  90. Jon Marshall says:

    I'm going to give you the best compliment I think I can give a YouTube cooking channel. I've fed this meal to my family and friends twice in one month because how easy concise and delicious it is. Even though it was twice in the same month they were just as impressed with the food the second time they ate it. Chicken tacos used to be my go to meal to please a group and people loved them but this is just too damn good. Thank you.

  91. londontrada says:

    What comes out with the peas at 6:10 🤔 is it a death maggot?

  92. koalaslide says:

    6:09 is that a worm?

  93. Luis Armando says:

    I love the american way of coocking, boiling everyhing until it dehydrates ando then add some of your fav liquid (that makes sense) and stir up; It just adds so much flavour, it's amazing

  94. Lalita P says:

    so yummy

  95. Danielle Anderson says:

    After watching your roast turkey video I thought of an incredible way to do the same thing with a chicken where you can make mashed potatoes while it cooks and add a shallot to the chicken instead of a whole onion and lo and behold I realize you've beaten me to the punch by several months.

  96. HYHCOOLguy Hiew says:

    im so glad this is not by howtobasic…

  97. JMD Productions says:

    Why don’t people use a blender or a food processor when making mashed potatoes? It just sounds like common sense

  98. Now we scoop says:

    What is the oyster?

  99. Cowclops says:

    My chicken is in the oven right now. I cooked it in my 10" calphalon on the stove for 12 minutes before i put it in the oven, and while I took liberties with my seasoning and whatnot, I'm excited for white meat and dark meat thats done at the same time. The thigh was around 135 when I moved it to the oven, breast was still fridge temp. Should be good.

  100. Kevin Chen says:

    This guy love white wine

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